Legalizing Marijuana In Georgia, Don't Break Out Munchies Just Yet

Post Election Day, people across the nation aren't just talking about President Obama and Mitt Romney, they're also talking about the legalization of marijuana.

Voters in Colorado and Washington both decided that the recreational use of marijuana should be legal in their states, and it begs the question, will others states follow suit?

When it comes to Georgia, this criminal defense attorney and municipal court judge says lighting up probably won't be legal here anytime soon.

"I think we are a very conservative state obviously, and just because of our conservative views, I don't think that would ever hit a ballot here," said Michelle Harrison.

Advocates argue marijuana prohibition results in needless arrests and incarcerations.

According to norml.com, a pro-legalization webite, the United States is 2nd, only to Russia, in its rate of incarceration per 100,000 people.

In our area, Michelle Harrison says legalizing the recreational use of marijuana would not help the crowded justice system.

"Marijuana is very, very minimal. Even as a criminal defense attorney, the amount of people, the possession charges is so minimal compared to what's on our dockets."

She says law enforcement's main goal is going after traffickers with large amounts of marijuana and other drugs and she doesn't think that issue will be solved by legalizing the use of a small amount.

"If you legalize it, there will be taxation involved with it that will make it more expensive, there will always be a call or need for cheap marijuana," said Harrison.

For people in Colorado and Washington, lighting up legally could be in the near future, but this legal expert doesn't think the idea would be a "big hit" in the CSRA.