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Caring for children through divorce in Georgia

| Dec 10, 2015 | Divorce |

Families going through the divorce process in Georgia have to work through a number of changes. Individuals that were completely connected with one another are now separating physically, emotionally, and financially. In many divorces, children are caught in between the two parents. There are some incredibly important things to remember concerning children during a divorce. 

Each situation is unique in how children react and how parents choose to work through each aspect of the process. It is important to inform children of what is going on and why mom and dad are no longer going to be together. This conversation has to be tailored to the child and consider how he or she will react emotionally. 

Throughout the divorce, there may be tension and hurt feelings between the two parties. In spite of this, speaking out against the other parent in front of the children or forcing them to choose sides is something that should be avoided. Working together and putting the needs of the children before their own is crucial, especially when the parents decide to co-parent or work through a shared child custody arrangement. 

Divorce can be a stressful process for couples and their children. These children caught in the middle of a divorce in Georgia are not supposed to be forced into the role of therapist or to choose sides. With the assistance of a legal professional, couples can work to form a child custody arrangement that best meets the needs of their children while acknowledging their schedules and limitations.

Source: huffingtonpost.com, “5 Tips for Helping Your Child Cope With Divorce”, Jennifer C. Walton, Dec. 9, 2015

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