We remain open for all of your legal needs! However due to the precautions related to COVID-19, we are trying to maintain compliance with all governmental orders and CDC Guidelines. Please contact our office to discuss whether a remote consultation is appropriate for your situation. Please CLICK HERE for more Covid-19 information.
Your Hometown Lawyers

| Oct 24, 2018 | Uncategorized |

Breaking up a family in Georgia is seldom easy, but it can be significantly more complicated when there are children involved. It is widely held that the continued involvement of both parents in the lives of their children is the most beneficial for the health and well-being of the children. Following a divorce, many parents opt to co-parent.

Co-parenting enables both parents to remain active in their children’s lives. This can contribute to a child’s feeling of security and stability. Parents endeavoring to co-parent should keep the focus on the child and try to leave any feelings of animosity towards each other out of the picture. Successful co-parenting can prevent some of the possible negative impacts on children such as poor school performance, increased anxiety and decreased self esteem.

A successful co-parenting arrangement requires work and commitment from both parents. Frequent communication is important to keeping up to date with a child’s life. This is particularly true where issues of education or health may be involved. The ability to negotiate differences can contribute to the success of the arrangement. Trying to see situations from the other person’s perspective can help to eliminate the temptation to argue.

If one is considering a divorce in Georgia and young children are involved, a conversation with an experienced family law attorney could prove beneficial. A knowledgeable lawyer may be familiar with multiple parenting approaches that can work after a divorce, and co-parenting is one of these. An attorney can review the family situation and may be able to advise the client regarding parenting options following a divorce.

Archives