October 2018 Archives

Cohabitation may make divorce more likely

According to the results of a study published in the Journal of Marriage and Family, couples who move in together prior to marrying are at a higher risk of divorce later. Georgia couples might want to be aware of the premarital cohabitation effect, which suggests that couples who live together before marriage have lower odds of divorce during the first year but increased odds of divorce every year after that.

Drug crime defense

Any person who has been accused of a crime should present the best defense that they possibly can in order to avoid the harsh penalties that come with a conviction. These can include fines, community service and imprisonment. The defense for a drug crime is generally developed with an attorney and is based on the facts of the case.

AAA study finds drivers overestimate car safety features

Georgia residents who own vehicles with advanced safety features like blind-spot monitoring and automatic emergency braking should be aware of their key limitations. Many do not, as the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety found out in a recent study, and they are relying too heavily on such features as a result.

Trucking industry slow to adopt crash avoidance technology

Studies have shown that crash avoidance technology can reduce traffic accidents in Georgia and across the U.S. However, it is not required on tractor-trailers and other large commercial trucks. This is troubling because truck-related fatal accidents are on the rise.

NHTSA numbers show fewer fatalities overall, more truck deaths

People and pedestrians might be safer on Georgia roadways in 2018 than they were in 2015 and 2016, but those in trucks might be in more danger. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration released 2017 figures on motor vehicle accident fatalities that showed the reversal of an upward trend in traffic deaths from 2015 and 2016. Preliminary figures from the first half of 2018 show a continuation of this trend.

Tax law changes could make divorce more costly

When anyone ends a marriage in Georgia, there are both figurative and literal costs involved. One especially noticeable change with the actual expenses related to untying the knot is with alimony and child support. This is because of a provision in the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) that will apply starting in 2019. In addition to lowering federal tax rates, the law also eliminates exemptions and many deductions, including those that previously applied to alimony and child support providers and recipients.

'Gray divorce' and retirement

Divorces for spouses who are at least 50 years old can be particularly devastating from a financial standpoint. Unfortunately, statistics show that more and more Georgia couples are dealing with "gray divorce." The Pew Research Center reports that the rate of divorce for adults who are age 50 or older is two times what it was in the 1990s. While shorter marriages and second marriages carry the most risk, the majority of gray divorces tend to take place among couples who have been married for at least 30 years.

Car crashes result when drivers rely too much on safety tech

Automobile manufacturers have made great strides in safety technology meant to increase safety for drivers and passengers in Georgia. Blind-spot monitoring systems and automatic emergency brakes can reduce accidents and the severity of injuries, but a survey conducted by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety has identified an unintended consequence. A portion of drivers rely too much on automatic sensors or fail to understand that the safety systems have limitations and require a human driver to remain vigilant.